Optimize Your Site for Pinterest

Optimize Your Site for Pinterest

Tamara Crawford

If you’re thinking of jumping into Pinterest.com, here are a few tips that can help you optimize your site and content:

You + Pinterest

Your brain is wired to process images in milliseconds. With that in mind, how can you optimize your site and imagery to play well with Pinterest?

Remember the Peacock
Pinterest is full of good-looking things. Invest in stunning imagery, differentiate and brand yourself. Then, evaluate your work with one simple test: Does it tell a story without words?

Speak Softly
80% of pins on Pinterest are repins. Get shared through creativity, concept, and emotional appeal, and target content to what people on Pinterest are interested in. Don’t shout your message or be overly self-promotional.

Evaluate your Code
If your site uses a lot of background images, people won’t be able to pin them. Pinterestable images should use the “img src=” tag. Pinterest does video, but it doesn’t do Flash.

Go Big. Go Home.
A Pinterest page has five columns of thumbnail images, each 192 pixels across. While you may only get 192 pixels in width, you can make a taller image that tells a long, creative story like “40 Ways To Tie Your Scarf,” or “6 Styles for Your Hair.”

An original 960×3500 pixel image will scale nicely into a tall, skyscraper-like visual in your pinboard. And create large source images that link from your thumbnail for maximum visual impact.

Pinterest is Social
Just like your Facebook and Twitter channels, it takes care and feeding. You can connect all three channels together, and addFollow and Pin It buttons to your site to make it easier for people to pin your content.

Plan Your Follow-Through
On Pinterest it can take a few clicks until you reach the website source for an image. If someone’s made it that far, they’re likely very interested in your content. Suddenly one of your standard site pages becomes a landing page if a photo from it gets pinned. That means when you build product, recipe or similar pages, think of them as the first point of entry for your site. And to manage your analytics to see traffic drivers, try these suggestions for Google Analytics and buildingRSS feeds.

De-stress the Stress
It’s possible to be upfront about how you’d like your images and video to be used. If you own rights to your images, consider choosing a Creative Commons (CC) license (there are six) that meets your criteria. All CC licenses require attribution, but at least this way visitors will know where you stand on image sharing and can feel more confident in their pins.

If you’re thinking of jumping into Pinterest.com, here are a few tips that can help you optimize your site and content:

You + Pinterest

Your brain is wired to process images in milliseconds. With that in mind, how can you optimize your site and imagery to play well with Pinterest?

Remember the Peacock
Pinterest is full of good-looking things. Invest in stunning imagery, differentiate and brand yourself. Then, evaluate your work with one simple test: Does it tell a story without words?

Speak Softly
80% of pins on Pinterest are repins. Get shared through creativity, concept, and emotional appeal, and target content to what people on Pinterest are interested in. Don’t shout your message or be overly self-promotional.

Evaluate your Code
If your site uses a lot of background images, people won’t be able to pin them. Pinterestable images should use the “img src=” tag. Pinterest does video, but it doesn’t do Flash.

Go Big. Go Home.
A Pinterest page has five columns of thumbnail images, each 192 pixels across. While you may only get 192 pixels in width, you can make a taller image that tells a long, creative story like “40 Ways To Tie Your Scarf,” or “6 Styles for Your Hair.”

An original 960×3500 pixel image will scale nicely into a tall, skyscraper-like visual in your pinboard. And create large source images that link from your thumbnail for maximum visual impact.

Pinterest is Social
Just like your Facebook and Twitter channels, it takes care and feeding. You can connect all three channels together, and addFollow and Pin It buttons to your site to make it easier for people to pin your content.

Plan Your Follow-Through
On Pinterest it can take a few clicks until you reach the website source for an image. If someone’s made it that far, they’re likely very interested in your content. Suddenly one of your standard site pages becomes a landing page if a photo from it gets pinned. That means when you build product, recipe or similar pages, think of them as the first point of entry for your site. And to manage your analytics to see traffic drivers, try these suggestions for Google Analytics and buildingRSS feeds.

De-stress the Stress
It’s possible to be upfront about how you’d like your images and video to be used. If you own rights to your images, consider choosing a Creative Commons (CC) license (there are six) that meets your criteria. All CC licenses require attribution, but at least this way visitors will know where you stand on image sharing and can feel more confident in their pins.

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