Football, Social Media, and the End of Workplace Productivity

Football, Social Media, and the End of Workplace Productivity

Phil Herbert

Am-football

 

Here at eROI, we are a football company, in more ways than one. Desks here are littered with Ducks, Beavers, hats that look like pieces of Cheese, foam fingers, and one really sad Niners fan. When it comes to our teams, we’re no stranger to office rivalries, betting pools and good natured ribbing abound.

Luckily for us, the football fandom doesn’t have to stop once work begins. We’re fortunate enough to call the Baltimore Sun one of our clients, and as part of that partnership, we get to tap into those same football passions for the entire state of Maryland. Last year we rode that wave of devotion and engagement all the way to the Super Bowl, and this year we are poised to make it even better.

We aren’t the only ones getting in on the NFL action, though. The biggest and most conservative of the major sports leagues has made a full 180 on social media, and is now poised to bring the 21st century to the gridiron. In that spirit, here are a couple of examples of NFL teams getting creative with social media as a means to engage their fans.

Redskins Photo Locker
At training camp this year, the Redskins put a locker full of fan gear up, which would automatically open when a fan would send it a Tweet. The fans could then get dressed up in the gear, and the locker would take a photo of the fan, and send them a TwitPic right back. It’s been so successful that they are planning on bringing it over to FedEx Field for game day.

Vikings Tweet-to-Peek
The Vikings had a new uniform design, and instead of hoping the design wouldn’t leak out early, they embraced the peek, and created a campaign where fans could get up to 12 snippets of the new design by interacting with the team on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter ahead of the official launch around Draft Day.

We love seeing new and innovative uses of social media, especially in an entrenched, old-school organization like the NFL. The only downside we can see is that America is going to lose even more of their work-time to football. In a world where Fantasy Football costs the US $18.7 billion every year, we feel it’s our patriotic duty to urge everyone to keep their social interactions to the weekends (and of course Monday nights, and Thursdays, and the occasional Wednesday and Friday)!

Am-football

 

Here at eROI, we are a football company, in more ways than one. Desks here are littered with Ducks, Beavers, hats that look like pieces of Cheese, foam fingers, and one really sad Niners fan. When it comes to our teams, we’re no stranger to office rivalries, betting pools and good natured ribbing abound.

Luckily for us, the football fandom doesn’t have to stop once work begins. We’re fortunate enough to call the Baltimore Sun one of our clients, and as part of that partnership, we get to tap into those same football passions for the entire state of Maryland. Last year we rode that wave of devotion and engagement all the way to the Super Bowl, and this year we are poised to make it even better.

We aren’t the only ones getting in on the NFL action, though. The biggest and most conservative of the major sports leagues has made a full 180 on social media, and is now poised to bring the 21st century to the gridiron. In that spirit, here are a couple of examples of NFL teams getting creative with social media as a means to engage their fans.

Redskins Photo Locker
At training camp this year, the Redskins put a locker full of fan gear up, which would automatically open when a fan would send it a Tweet. The fans could then get dressed up in the gear, and the locker would take a photo of the fan, and send them a TwitPic right back. It’s been so successful that they are planning on bringing it over to FedEx Field for game day.

Vikings Tweet-to-Peek
The Vikings had a new uniform design, and instead of hoping the design wouldn’t leak out early, they embraced the peek, and created a campaign where fans could get up to 12 snippets of the new design by interacting with the team on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter ahead of the official launch around Draft Day.

We love seeing new and innovative uses of social media, especially in an entrenched, old-school organization like the NFL. The only downside we can see is that America is going to lose even more of their work-time to football. In a world where Fantasy Football costs the US $18.7 billion every year, we feel it’s our patriotic duty to urge everyone to keep their social interactions to the weekends (and of course Monday nights, and Thursdays, and the occasional Wednesday and Friday)!

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