Deal fatigue will spell the end of Daily Deals… right?

Deal fatigue will spell the end of Daily Deals… right?

Matt Popkes

Ah the morning routine. Shower, shave, news, breakfast, coffee, open email, delete 14 new daily deal emails and then it’s off to work!

Purging my inbox of the multitude of daily deals and discounts has become such a fixture of my morning that I don’t even notice when I’m doing it anymore. Just to have some info to write this, I needed to scour my email Trash bin to recover the half dozen or so I had thoughtlessly deleted a few minutes prior. It’s a reflex, a mindless chore, a daily task as engrained in my day as tying my shoes.

Fact is, I just don’t have time to care. I don’t have the luxury of sifting through the daily barrage of 50% off knitting lessons, 30% off turtleneck cat sweaters and 25% off a pedicure (only good 10am-10:07am, on even days, every other leap year) to find an offer that is actually relevant to me and my interests. Because of that and without a second thought, Groupon, Living Social and the 500+ uninspired rip-offs that make up their competition get a quick, daily delete from my inbox. Everyone else must feel the same fatigue, right?

As it turns out, a recent study shows that of the 15% of the U.S. population that subscribes to at least one daily deal, more than half are purchasing and using them as frequently or more frequently than when they started. 15% may seem like a small concentration but in terms of the total population, that’s nearly 50 million active subscribers, the majority of which continue to purchase, although sometimes reluctantly.

Despite the ranting of supposed time-starved people like myself, daily deals are still very much alive with tremendous potential for growth, especially considering that 85% of Americans still don’t subscribe. Additional opportunities lie in segmentation and targeting of the current audience to deliver hyper-relevant deals and discounts to a specific audience. Give sports fans discounts and tickets and apparel. Send a pedicure discount to someone who has bought similar deals in the past.

Learn as much as you can about your subscribers and customize what you’re sending them. In my case, it could eventually turn my daily morning deletes into a daily purchase or two.

Matt Popkes Google+ profile
_matt popkes :: Strategy Manager at eROI.

Ah the morning routine. Shower, shave, news, breakfast, coffee, open email, delete 14 new daily deal emails and then it’s off to work!

Purging my inbox of the multitude of daily deals and discounts has become such a fixture of my morning that I don’t even notice when I’m doing it anymore. Just to have some info to write this, I needed to scour my email Trash bin to recover the half dozen or so I had thoughtlessly deleted a few minutes prior. It’s a reflex, a mindless chore, a daily task as engrained in my day as tying my shoes.

Fact is, I just don’t have time to care. I don’t have the luxury of sifting through the daily barrage of 50% off knitting lessons, 30% off turtleneck cat sweaters and 25% off a pedicure (only good 10am-10:07am, on even days, every other leap year) to find an offer that is actually relevant to me and my interests. Because of that and without a second thought, Groupon, Living Social and the 500+ uninspired rip-offs that make up their competition get a quick, daily delete from my inbox. Everyone else must feel the same fatigue, right?

As it turns out, a recent study shows that of the 15% of the U.S. population that subscribes to at least one daily deal, more than half are purchasing and using them as frequently or more frequently than when they started. 15% may seem like a small concentration but in terms of the total population, that’s nearly 50 million active subscribers, the majority of which continue to purchase, although sometimes reluctantly.

Despite the ranting of supposed time-starved people like myself, daily deals are still very much alive with tremendous potential for growth, especially considering that 85% of Americans still don’t subscribe. Additional opportunities lie in segmentation and targeting of the current audience to deliver hyper-relevant deals and discounts to a specific audience. Give sports fans discounts and tickets and apparel. Send a pedicure discount to someone who has bought similar deals in the past.

Learn as much as you can about your subscribers and customize what you’re sending them. In my case, it could eventually turn my daily morning deletes into a daily purchase or two.

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