Paid for by Citizens Against Terrible Advertising

Paid for by Citizens Against Terrible Advertising

Matt Popkes

In our modern age of political divisiveness and partisan bickering, it’s nice to know we can all agree on one thing; political advertising has become an unbearable and inescapable force.

Campaign messaging, whether it be for a candidate or ballot measure, locally or nationally, has effectively invaded and monopolized nearly every means of communication and channel for advertising in our lives. From your television screen to your mailbox, your social feeds to your cell phone, attempts to form and mold your opinion on things you didn’t know you cared about are being made every minute. This isn’t new. This is how election season works. But, the more efficiently we communicate and interconnected the world becomes, the worse this is going to get. Something has got to give.

I’m not advocating an end to political advertising and campaigns as it’s a necessary, albiet irritating aspect of our democratic process. What I would like to see, however, is a more creative approach that gives more credit to the audience. Political advertising treats people like they’re idiots, more often than not, attempting to exploit the more negative aspects of the human condition; fear, jealousy, greed, insecurity, anger, et cetera. Have our expectations of political campaigns fallen to such an insurmountable low that we’ve accepted that this is “just the way it is”? We demand integrity and accountability of our elected officials but hold no such standards when it comes to the campaigns that get them elected?

It’s 2012 and there are more specialized ad agencies than ever. The level of talent and plethora of agencies to choose from has driven both fierce competition as well as some of the most creative, strategic and memorable campaigns to date. If you can afford otherwise, having bad advertising is just no longer an option. And considering most political campaigns have ad budgets larger than entire world economies, they can afford to do better.

You, the reader, deserve a heartfelt congratulations and pat on the back. No, seriously. Your display of self-control and level headedness over the past several weeks is commendable and deserving of a genuine “atta kid”. The fact that election season officially ends this week and that you made it all the way through without hurling your laptop out the window and smashing your television screen with a projectile is truly admirable. Well done.

Matt Popkes Google+ profile
_matt popkes :: Strategy Manager at eROI.

In our modern age of political divisiveness and partisan bickering, it’s nice to know we can all agree on one thing; political advertising has become an unbearable and inescapable force.

Campaign messaging, whether it be for a candidate or ballot measure, locally or nationally, has effectively invaded and monopolized nearly every means of communication and channel for advertising in our lives. From your television screen to your mailbox, your social feeds to your cell phone, attempts to form and mold your opinion on things you didn’t know you cared about are being made every minute. This isn’t new. This is how election season works. But, the more efficiently we communicate and interconnected the world becomes, the worse this is going to get. Something has got to give.

I’m not advocating an end to political advertising and campaigns as it’s a necessary, albiet irritating aspect of our democratic process. What I would like to see, however, is a more creative approach that gives more credit to the audience. Political advertising treats people like they’re idiots, more often than not, attempting to exploit the more negative aspects of the human condition; fear, jealousy, greed, insecurity, anger, et cetera. Have our expectations of political campaigns fallen to such an insurmountable low that we’ve accepted that this is “just the way it is”? We demand integrity and accountability of our elected officials but hold no such standards when it comes to the campaigns that get them elected?

It’s 2012 and there are more specialized ad agencies than ever. The level of talent and plethora of agencies to choose from has driven both fierce competition as well as some of the most creative, strategic and memorable campaigns to date. If you can afford otherwise, having bad advertising is just no longer an option. And considering most political campaigns have ad budgets larger than entire world economies, they can afford to do better.

You, the reader, deserve a heartfelt congratulations and pat on the back. No, seriously. Your display of self-control and level headedness over the past several weeks is commendable and deserving of a genuine “atta kid”. The fact that election season officially ends this week and that you made it all the way through without hurling your laptop out the window and smashing your television screen with a projectile is truly admirable. Well done.

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