Add big personality to your big-brand

Add big personality to your big-brand

Gerry Blakney

I flew this week to Oakland for work. I have not been on a flight for over three years and that was a whirlwind, family trip to meet my brother’s newborn son, with my grandmother, brother, and mom— not allowing me the time or freedom to simply sit and admire commercial air travel.

The flight attendant on the return flight, #2853, who pantomimed the welcome, safety procedures, in-flight directions, and finally the final ‘welcome to the city you flew to, have a nice day’ speech was a marketing genius. She was informative while being personable and funny which, because of this,  caused me to listen to her every word. I listened with anticipation to all of the in-flight information like it was my first flight ever.

And in some ways it was, this is the first time that such a large brand- Southwest Airlines- showed an engaging and intelligent personality while still giving me the directions I needed. And honestly, I found myself craving more.

“…if you are with a young child, please secure your air mask first before securing theirs. If you are sitting next to my ex-boyfriend don’t even bother.” -Southwest flight attendant

This unique approach, that I am sure is not regulation- but should be, was so refreshing that I have now liked, tweeted, and written this blog post about Southwest Airlines. If you could guarantee that each and every flight would have an ad libbing mastermind, I would fly Southwest exclusively (despite your screwy general seating scheme).

This level of brand-loyalty is from one person, on one flight— imagine the impact if more of your big-brand interactions were as honest and hilariously-human as my flight attendant’s quips. Give your brand a personality and your customers a friend to relate to, they’ll thank you for it.

“You may now turn on your electronic devices to Facebook, tweet, and instagram about Southwest getting you to your destination ahead of schedule because we know you certainly would if we didn’t.”

I flew this week to Oakland for work. I have not been on a flight for over three years and that was a whirlwind, family trip to meet my brother’s newborn son, with my grandmother, brother, and mom— not allowing me the time or freedom to simply sit and admire commercial air travel.

The flight attendant on the return flight, #2853, who pantomimed the welcome, safety procedures, in-flight directions, and finally the final ‘welcome to the city you flew to, have a nice day’ speech was a marketing genius. She was informative while being personable and funny which, because of this,  caused me to listen to her every word. I listened with anticipation to all of the in-flight information like it was my first flight ever.

And in some ways it was, this is the first time that such a large brand- Southwest Airlines- showed an engaging and intelligent personality while still giving me the directions I needed. And honestly, I found myself craving more.

“…if you are with a young child, please secure your air mask first before securing theirs. If you are sitting next to my ex-boyfriend don’t even bother.” -Southwest flight attendant

This unique approach, that I am sure is not regulation- but should be, was so refreshing that I have now liked, tweeted, and written this blog post about Southwest Airlines. If you could guarantee that each and every flight would have an ad libbing mastermind, I would fly Southwest exclusively (despite your screwy general seating scheme).

This level of brand-loyalty is from one person, on one flight— imagine the impact if more of your big-brand interactions were as honest and hilariously-human as my flight attendant’s quips. Give your brand a personality and your customers a friend to relate to, they’ll thank you for it.

“You may now turn on your electronic devices to Facebook, tweet, and instagram about Southwest getting you to your destination ahead of schedule because we know you certainly would if we didn’t.”

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